MYSTcommunity: Myst V: Does It Work as a Finale? - MYSTcommunity

Jump to content

Page 1 of 1

Myst V: Does It Work as a Finale? One newish fan's examantion of the series's most polarizing ga

#1 User is offline   Andrewnuva199 

  • glotahn (beginner)
  • Group: Member
  • Posts: 125
  • Joined: 21-November 08
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Do you think I would give it?
  • KI number:00209849

Posted 05 August 2011 - 03:42 PM

I think I can safely say that my interest in Myst doesn't hold as strongly as it did a year or two ago when I seriously started playing the games. I've been doing much more with games from the Valve library these days, and various disrtactions have sadly kept me from the URU Mystcommunity meetings. But that's not to say that I'm not dropping this series off the radar. I have a LEGO-built Myst Island Library and amuterer replicas of Myst and Relto Linking Books in my room to remind me of one of the more notable video game franchises in history.

And as I sit here thinking of some way to find interest in these forums, I thought, "Hey, maybe I could post my thoughts on one of the series's most controversial titles!"

So here we are on the sub-forum for Myst V: End of Ages. The grand finale with the full 3D environment Cyan Worlds always wanted. The game that looked back on the series as it came to a climax that "determined the fate of a civilization." The game that emphasized burdens like nobody's business.

I played the game some time ago, but my memories remain fresh enough to look back at what we got and reach my own conclusion on how the game stands.

And what I think is that the game worked fine for a finale for the series.

First I think about the whole story: the point of Myst V is to finish the quest that proves us worthy of owning a Tablet that controls an entire species of mysterious creatures that seem to know a lot about the Art. It's a story that's rather far off from the rest of the series, Uru aside, but I feel that it connects a lot better than we think, given the nature of Yeesha’s burden.

It could be said that Aturs has felt a responsibility to preserve the legacy of the D’ni civilization after escaping Gehn’s shadow, and after finding other survivors of the Fall, help it to move on from the past atrocities (though after Myst III, he would not mean to shove them under the rug). To him, it seemed necessary to face their errors, correct them the best he and his friends and family could, while still beginning things anew, which he eventually decided to do with creating Releeshahn. It would be a goal he had personal investment in, having had to handle his family’s role in the Fall and the atrocities his father and sons had committed.

While we still know little about how Yeesha learned of the Bahro and became associated with them, it isn’t unreasonable to think that she spoke with her family about them and their history, and the fact that the D’ni had enslaved a species so unique and powerful must’ve been a bombshell of shock to Aturs, especially since it had always appeared that the D’ni had never gone so far according to all other records. He might’ve felt a need himself to fix this last, great wrong, but as far as we know, he was able to do little to help the situation by the time he was too old to do much of anything. So the burden would fall upon Yeesha, which likely motivated her into the position we see her in Uru: convincing the masses of D’ni Explorers from the surface that the civilization was not perfect, and to support her efforts to fix the last great wrong.

Perhaps, had Explorers remained at a steady rate of travel to the D’ni realm and the DRC had not collapsed, a special few or a big group effort would’ve been the solution to freeing the Bahro. But as it was, it became the responsibility of one to go on the quest, to follow the footsteps of the Stranger and help Atrus’s family one last time.

The game also feels very different from the previous entries in the series, that is true. Linking Books are barely used in favor of the mystical workings of the Tablet and Slates, and the basic puzzle solving mechanics are mixed up a bit by the use of the Tablet to “communicate” with the Bahro and affect the environment itself. Thematically, however, the game works much like the previous titles. We are still slowly progressing through ages, solving puzzles in the form of odd contraptions, security measures, and environmental hazards, all with the intention of reaching a goal at the end of the Age.

And in essence, “Choosing the Fate of a Civilizaton,” while much more monumental than standard Myst objectives, still falls under the ever-present goal of deciding important fates of important people or groups. Myst saw us having to figure out what man entrapped in these books was telling the truth, which would be critical to the family’s condition as well as the players. Riven had us seeking the safety of ourselves, Catherine and the good natives of the Age, while having to take down the tryant who has ruled over and terrorized them all. Exile revolves around us protecting the future of D’ni civilization from being ruined by a madman wronged by Atrus’s family and out for vengance. In Revelation, while on a slightly smaller point on the scale of importance, the objective of retrieving Yeesha from the clutches of the Son of Atrus who hadn’t reformed is critical to the survival of the family, which likely has some major role still in Releeshahn and the legacy of D’ni. End of Ages simply progresses up the level of critically important goals to the grandest scale feasible: putting the final burden of Atrus’s family to rest, seeing to the survival of an incredibly unique sapient species, and thanks to Esher’s presence and goals, the role of the D’ni civilization in the handling of the Ages.

Story-wise, Myst V is considerably still a good successor and ending to the saga revolving around being a friend and helper to Atrus’s family, though I’ll be the first to admit that it isn’t perfect. For one to go from Myst IV to V, the sudden change of setting and circumstance from the classic Myst era (the setting of the first 4 games) to the era of Uru (which Myst V is undeniably set in) is quite a jarring one. Atrus and Yeesha’s minimal presence, the latter’s journals, Releeshahn, K’veer and Myst Island are the only connections to the old games, the old tunnels between D’ni and the surface being more of a connection to Uru and the novels (barring the dagger from Riven in the volcano interior at the start of the tunnels). It all works well, truly, for a special entry in the Uru era of the Myst story, but it does have a hard time looking the part of a Myst game.

Overall though, Myst V does work well as both a proper Myst game and a finale for the series proper, but it highly depends on how you look at it. Cyan did the best they could, I’m sure, and I appreciate that they did apply the fully live-3D environments that making realMyst and Uru gained them. But the game does feel like it could’ve used more explanation and connection with the previous games, and perhaps a little toning-down of the elements from Uru’s story (more Linking Book use, perhaps?). Truly, the game isn’t without faults, but I wouldn’t say that it isn’t work calling a failure of a send-off to over a decade of enjoyment, understanding and being a part of backstory, and having one of a handful of opportunities to learn a full language from a fictional universe.

From what I see, it works very well. Not perfectly, but very well.
0

#2 User is offline   aander91 

  • Forum game like its 2008
  • Group: Veteran Member
  • Posts: 2,669
  • Joined: 20-January 07
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Realm of Eternal Ice
  • KI number:00087015

Posted 05 August 2011 - 05:04 PM

I haven't played EoA, I got about half way through before I had to reformat and haven't bothered to install it since, so here are my thoughts.

It feels to me like a futuristic version of Myst, which I suppose it technically is, but in a way that drastically separates itself from the rest of the series. The lack of liking books sets up a rather interesting kind of tone. It feels like the events of the past games were hundreds of year ago (again, I think they were) and I think that EoA being the last of a series that is quickly losing popularity makes it feel like you (the player), Esher, and Yeesha are the only people who are aware of the art and the existence of this world.


Kinda cool.
0

#3 User is offline   Andrewnuva199 

  • glotahn (beginner)
  • Group: Member
  • Posts: 125
  • Joined: 21-November 08
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Do you think I would give it?
  • KI number:00209849

Posted 05 August 2011 - 10:23 PM

View Postaander91, on 05 August 2011 - 05:04 PM, said:

I haven't played EoA, I got about half way through before I had to reformat and haven't bothered to install it since, so here are my thoughts.

It feels to me like a futuristic version of Myst, which I suppose it technically is, but in a way that drastically separates itself from the rest of the series. The lack of liking books sets up a rather interesting kind of tone. It feels like the events of the past games were hundreds of year ago (again, I think they were) and I think that EoA being the last of a series that is quickly losing popularity makes it feel like you (the player), Esher, and Yeesha are the only people who are aware of the art and the existence of this world.


Kinda cool.


That's another nice way of looking at it. The sense of being alone and without purpose besides the main quest, which I think Myst had, is here in End of Ages as well. The other games lose that when it's established from Riven onwards that you're a close associate and friend to the family of Atrus, which gives everything a personal connection with your objectives.

With Myst V, it's even established in after-the-fact info from Uru that you're not even playing as the Stranger from the other games (I shant say any more as to avoid further controversy), and with Yeesha having grown up into an individual that's far different from the young, innocent child we only knew in Revelation, it brings you back to the days where you're trying to figure out what the heck is up with those two brothers in the red and blue books and who is responsible for the messes in all the ages.

And you're right. Nor only is it technically true that Myst V is set hundreds of years after the original games, the strange and hard to understand devices that are the Bahro slates help to bring a sense of futurism. Okay, sure, that may seem off-putting for some, but I think if it works well in context (and I think it does here as well as in Indiana Jones IV), such "alien" new additions to the story can be pulled off well.

But I do only speak for myself. I know others are likely to think differently.
0

#4 User is offline   aander91 

  • Forum game like its 2008
  • Group: Veteran Member
  • Posts: 2,669
  • Joined: 20-January 07
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Realm of Eternal Ice
  • KI number:00087015

Posted 05 August 2011 - 10:56 PM

View PostAndrewnuva199, on 05 August 2011 - 10:23 PM, said:

View Postaander91, on 05 August 2011 - 05:04 PM, said:

I haven't played EoA, I got about half way through before I had to reformat and haven't bothered to install it since, so here are my thoughts.

It feels to me like a futuristic version of Myst, which I suppose it technically is, but in a way that drastically separates itself from the rest of the series. The lack of liking books sets up a rather interesting kind of tone. It feels like the events of the past games were hundreds of year ago (again, I think they were) and I think that EoA being the last of a series that is quickly losing popularity makes it feel like you (the player), Esher, and Yeesha are the only people who are aware of the art and the existence of this world.


Kinda cool.


That's another nice way of looking at it. The sense of being alone and without purpose besides the main quest, which I think Myst had, is here in End of Ages as well. The other games lose that when it's established from Riven onwards that you're a close associate and friend to the family of Atrus, which gives everything a personal connection with your objectives.

With Myst V, it's even established in after-the-fact info from Uru that you're not even playing as the Stranger from the other games (I shant say any more as to avoid further controversy), and with Yeesha having grown up into an individual that's far different from the young, innocent child we only knew in Revelation, it brings you back to the days where you're trying to figure out what the heck is up with those two brothers in the red and blue books and who is responsible for the messes in all the ages.

And you're right. Nor only is it technically true that Myst V is set hundreds of years after the original games, the strange and hard to understand devices that are the Bahro slates help to bring a sense of futurism. Okay, sure, that may seem off-putting for some, but I think if it works well in context (and I think it does here as well as in Indiana Jones IV), such "alien" new additions to the story can be pulled off well.

But I do only speak for myself. I know others are likely to think differently.


Gah, I hated Crystal Skull, but that's for another thread I guess.

The interesting thing about EoA is that it seems to feel more like the other games are in the past than it does that EoA feels in the future. Interesting effect.

It's weird for me because I don't particularly like EoA, but I really can't complain too much from what I've seen. My only real complaint (and this applies to Uru as well) is that the realtime engine just doesn't work well on most of the ages. realMyst worked particularly well because the ages were smaller and more easily navigable in realtime, and when the ages were bigger you could just tell Chewie to punch it and be on the other side of the map. Uru had some huuuge areas that took forever to explore, which is a shame because the worlds felt big, which is a fantastic accomplishment in any game. EoA wasn't that bad with this, but the explorable areas were so straight forward that it was boring. Like Taghira is literally one big hallway.
0

Share this topic:


Page 1 of 1


Fast Reply

  

1 User(s) are reading this topic
0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users